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Observance of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the First Permanent Settlement in the Delaware River Valley 1938

Message from the President of the United States, transmitting, in compliance with the request of the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission, the report of the Commission setting forth the incidents and activities in connection with the observance of the three hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley, which was celebrated at Wilmington, Delaware; Philadelphia and Chester, Pennsylvania; and Swedesboro and Salem, New Jersey, in the year 1938
 

Message of the President

To the Congress of the United States:
In compliance with the request of the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission, which was established in accordance with the provisions of Public Resolution No. 102, Seventy-fourth Congress, approved June 5, 1936, and extended under Public Resolution No. 71, Seventy-fifth Congress, approved August 25, 1937, I transmit herewith the Commission's report setting forth the incidents and activities in connection with the celebration which was held at Wilmington, Del., Philadelphia, Pa., and Swedesboro and Salem, N. J., in the year 1938.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

The White House, July 1, 1940.

 

Letter of Submittal

The President,

White House, Washington D. C.

Sir: Pursuant to Public Resolution No. 102, Seventy-fourth Congress, authorizing and requesting the President to extend to the Government of Sweden and individuals an invitation to join the Government and people of the United States in the observance of the three-hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware Valley, and for other purposes; and Public Resolution No. 71, Seventy-fifth Congress, the latter including the Government of Finland in such celebration, we have the honor on behalf of the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission, appointed in pursuance of said resolutions of Congress, to submit herewith, for transmission to the Congress, the report of said Commission setting forth the incidents and activities in connection with the celebration and pertinent material of an historical nature relating thereto.

Respectfully,

Joseph F. Guffey, President.
John G. Townsend, Jr., Vice President.
Pehr G. Holmes, Secretary.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

The United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission, created and authorized by Public Resolution No. 102, Seventy-fourth Congress (approved June 5, 1936), as amended by Public Resolution No. 71, Seventy-fifth Congress (approved August 25, 1937), to prepare and carry through a program to celebrate the three-hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the first permanent settlement by white men in the Delaware River Valley, namely, the settlement established by the New Sweden Company on March 29, 1638, and named Fort Christina, on the site of present-day Wilmington, Del., respectfully submits the following report:

The celebration in the year 1938 of the three-hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley by an expedition under Peter Minuit, sent out from Sweden by the New Sweden Co., attracted much attention in the United States, in the Kingdom of Sweden, and in the Republic of Finland. This great interest was due to the fact that the settlement (which was made on the soil of the present State of Delaware) proved to be the beginning of the colony of New Sweden, a colony which eventually embraced parts of all three States bordering on the Delaware River (Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey), and the inhabitants of which were subjects of the Swedish Crown, until the year 1655, having emigrated to America from the various Swedish provinces of that day, including the Duchy of Finland.

As a result of the widespread international, national, State, and racial interest in the celebration, many official, as well as unofficial commissions, associations, and committees, were organized to participate in it. As early as the spring of 1935, the General Assembly of the State of Delaware authorized the appointment of a preparatory commission to formulate plans to celebrate the founding of that State. This commission was known as the Delaware Swedish Tercentenary Commission, and its principal officers were Col. George A. Elliott, president; United States District Judge John P. Nields, vice president; and Prof. George H. Ryden, University of Delaware, General Secretary. This commission was authorized to secure from the United States Government 25,000 half-dollar silver coins, commemorating the Delaware State Tercentenary. These coins were sold to collectors all over this country, in Sweden, and other foreign lands. Official commissions were later appointed in the States of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and as the time of celebration approached, commissions were appointed by about 25 other States of the Union.

The racial groups in America most interested in the celebration were, of course, the Swedish and Finnish, and for the purpose of coordinating the efforts of the religious, educational, historical, fraternal, and other societies within these groups, two Nation-wide organizations were formed, namely, the Swedish-American Tercentenary Association and the American-Finnish Delaware Tercentenary Committee. In addition to cooperating with the three principal State tercentenary commissions in their official State celebrations, held respectively, at Wilmington, in Delaware, at Chester and Philadelphia, in Pennsylvania, and at Swedesboro and Salem, in New Jersey, these racial organizations sponsored elaborate celebrations of their own in important centers in the East, Middle West, and the far West, with State and local officials participating.

The principal officers of the Swedish-American Tercentenary Association were Mr. Francis J. Plym, of Niles, Mich., president; Mr. George N. Jeppson, of Worcester, Mass., first vice president; Dr. Amandus Johnson, American Swedish Historical Museum, Philadelphia, corresponding secretary; Mr. Nils R. Johaneson, of New York, chairman, finance committee; Dr. Naboth Hedin, of New York, chairman of the publicity committee; and Col. O. N. Solbert, of Rochester, N. Y., chairman of the executive committee. The principal officers of the American-Finnish Delaware Tercentenary Committee were the Honorable O. J. Larson, of Duluth, Minn., chairman; Prof. John H. Wuorinen, of Columbia University, New York, executive secretary; Mr. John Saari, of New York, treasurer; and Mr. Emil Hurja, of Washington, D. C., chairman of the Finnish Monument Committee.

Pursuant to Public Resolution No. 102, Seventy-fourth Congress, referred to above, the following members of the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission were appointed:

By the President of the United States: Alexander B. Geary, Esq., of Chester, Pa.; Hon. Richard S. Rodney, of New Castle, Del.; Mr. Harris Samonisky, of Wilmington, Del.; Mr. Carl F. Scheidt, of Norristown, Pa.; and Christopher L. Ward, Esq., of Wilmington, Del.

By the President of the Senate: Hon. W. Warren Barbour, of New Jersey; Hon. James J. Davis, of Pennsylvania; Hon. Joseph F. Guffey, of Pennsylvania; Hon. A. Harry Moore, of New Jersey; and Hon. John G. Townsend, Jr., of Delaware.

By the Speaker of the House of Representatives: Hon. Patrick J. Boland, of Pennsylvania; Hon. Harry L. Haines, of Pennsylvania; Hon. Pehr G. Holmes, of Massachusetts; Hon. J. George Stewart, of Delaware; and Hon. Francis E. Walter, of Pennsylvania.

Hon. W. Warren Barbour, of New Jersey, having been succeeded on April 15, 1937, by the Honorable William H. Smathers as Senator from that State, the latter was duly appointed on the Commission in his stead. Hon. A. Harry Moore, of New Jersey, having resigned from the Senate on January 18, 1938, to become Governor of that State, the Honorable Ernest Lundeen, a Senator from Minnesota, was duly appointed on the Commission to fill the vacancy caused by the aforesaid resignation. Hon. J. George Stewart, of Delaware, having been succeeded by Hon. William F. Allen as a Member of the House of Representatives from that State on January 3, 1937, the latter was duly appointed on the Commission to fill the vacancy.

The members of this Commission as thus constituted assembled on February 9, 1937, and elected the following officers:

Hon. Joseph F. Guffey, President; Hon. John G. Townsend, Jr., Vice President; and Hon. Pehr G. Holmes, Secretary.

In addition to the above officers, three other members of the Commission were appointed to serve on the executive committee, namely, the Honorable Richard S. Rodney, of Delaware, Mr. Christopher L. Ward, of Delaware, and Mr. Alexander B. Geary, of Pennsylvania.

The executive committee, with Senator Guffey as chairman, Senator Townsend as vice chairman, and Congressman Holmes as secretary, was authorized to make all plans for and on behalf of the Commission.

On May 11, 1938, the Postmaster General publicly announced that the special commemorative stam to be issued in commemoration of the three hundredth anniversary of the landing of the first Swedish and Finnish colonists in this country would be placed on first-day sale at the Wilmington, Del., post office on June 27.

Wilmington was chosen as the first-day sale city for the Delaware stamp by reason of the fact that it was on the site of this city that the Swedish and Finnish colonists made their first settlement, although the New Sweden colony actually comprised parts of what is now New Jersey and Pennsylvania as well as Delaware.

The stamp had as its central design a reproduction of an oil painting by the Wilmington artist, Stanley Arthurs, depicting the arrival of the first permanent settlers in the State of Delaware.

Inasmuch as celebrations of the three-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the colony of New Sweden in the Delaware River Valley were to be held also by the three States bordering on the Delaware River, namely, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, it appeared desirable that the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission should cooperate with the three official commissions of these States, namely, The Delaware Tercentenary Commission, The Pennsylvania Three Hundredth Anniversary Commission, and The New Jersey Commission to Commemorate the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement by the Swedes and Finns on the Delaware.

The principal officers of the Delaware commission were: Gov. Richard C. McMullen, honorary president; Ex-Gov. C. Douglass Buck, honorary vice president; former United States Senator Thomas F. Bayard, president; United States Senator John G. Townsend, Jr., vice president; Mr. Christopher L. Ward, chairman of the executive committee; and Prof. George H. Ryden, corresponding secretary of the executive committee.

The principal officers of the Pennsylvania commission were Gov. George H. Earle, honorary chairman; United States Senator Joseph F. Guffey, honorary chairman; Mr. Frank W. Melvin, chairman of the executive committee; and Mr. Karl E. Lindgren, vice chairman of the executive committee.

The principal officers of the New Jersey commission were Gov. A. Harry Moore, honorary chairman; and Hon. D. Stewart Craven, chairman.

In agreement with the Department of State, the United States Commission and the three commissions representing the States of Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey decided to devote four days to the tercentenary celebration in those States after which the United States Commission should assume charge of the celebration in the city of Washington and that the celebration should begin at Wilmington, Del., on the morning of Monday, June 27, and continue there for the rest of the day. On the 28th the celebration should be at Philadelphia, and on the 29th at Philadelphia and Chester. On the 30th the celebration should be held at Swedesboro and Salem, N. J., and then on Friday, July 1, should be transferred to Washington, D. C., and continued there throughout Sunday, July 3.

Since the two congressional resolutions authorized the President of the United States to invite the Governments of Sweden and Finland to participate in the tercentenary celebration, invitations were duly sent to them by the Department of State. Both Governments accepted and appointed commissions. Commemorative silver coins were minted by the Swedish Government and commemorative postage stamps and medals were issued by both the Swedish and Finnish Governments. Moreover, popular subscriptions were collected in Sweden to a fund, amounting to $50,000, for the purpose of presenting to the people of the United States a monument to be raised on the site in Wilmington, Del., where the colony of New Sweden was first planted. The world-famous Swedish sculptor Carl Milles was chosen to design the monument.

The diplomatic representatives of the two Governments, in Washington, namely, the Honorable Wollmar F. Boström, Minister from Sweden, and the Honorable Eero Järnefelt Minister from Finland, made all arrangements with the Department of State for the participation of their respective national commissions in the tercentenary celebration.

The members of the official Swedish delegation which came to America to participate in the tercentenary celebration were as follows: His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Sweden; Her Royal Highness the Crown Princess of Sweden; and His Highness Prince Gustaf Bertil.

The royal suite: Mr. Nils Rudebeck, master of the household of H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Sweden; Miss Brita Steuch, lady in waiting to H. R. H. the Crown Princess of Sweden; Lt. Col. Gunnar Ekeroth, aide de camp to H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Sweden; Count Nils Fersen Gyldenstolpe, chamberlain to H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Sweden; Mr. Gunnar Hägglöf, chief of section of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, private secretary to H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Sweden; Dr. H. Ernberg, physician of H. R. H. the Crown prince of Sweden; and Mr. Nils Erik Millar, secretary of the household of H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Sweden.

Members of the Royal Swedish New Sweden Commission: Mr. J. Sigfrid Edström, chairman; Count Folke Bernadotte Af Wisborg, vice chairman; Mr. Olof H. Lamm, former consul general at New York, honorary secretary of the Commission; Mrs. Rickard Sandler, wife of the Minister of Foreign Affairs; Mr. Fritz Henriksson, chief of the press department of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs; Maj. Herbert Jacobsson; Mr. Josef Sachs, vice chairman of the Chamber of Commerce of Stockholm.

Representatives of the Cabinet: Dr. Karl Levinson, Minister without portfolio; Dr. Arthur Engberg, Minister of Public Worship and Education.

The Parliament: Mr. Johan Nilsson, Speaker of the First Chamber of the Riksdag, Governor of the Province of Kristianstad; Mr. August Sävström, Speaker of the Second Chamber of the Riksdag.

The Higher Administration: Mr. Karl Schlyter, president of the Court of Appeals for Skåne and Blekinge, former Minister of Justice, Member of the First Chamber of the Riksdag; Mr. Herman Eriksson, president of the Royal Board of Trade; Mr. Bernhard Eriksson, Governor of the Province of Dalarna, former Minister of the Navy, former Minister of the Interior; Dr. Isak Collijn, Librarian of the Realm; Dr. Sigurd Curman, Custodian of the Antiquities of the Realm.

The Church: The Right Reverend Edvard Rodhe, D. D., Bishop of Lund; the Right Reverend Gustaf Ljunggren, D. D., Bishop of Skara.

Education and Science: Dr. Östen Undén, chancellor for the Universities, former Minister for Foreign Affairs; Dr. Hanna Rydh, archeologist; Dr. Sigfrid Hansson, president of the Royal Social Board; Dr. Knut Emil Lundmark, professor of astronomy; Mr. Yngve Hugo, lecturer, the Swedish Broadcasting Company.

The city of Stockholm: Mr. Johan Olov Johansson, chairman of the City Council of Stockholm; Lt. Gen. G. R. J. Åkerman, vice chairman of the City Council of Stockholm, former Minister of War.

The city of Gothenburg: Mr. Ernst Jungen, chairman of the City Council of Göteborg.

Social work: Miss Kerstin Hesselgren, Member of the Second Chamber of the Riksdag.

Engineering: Mr. Oscar Falkman, civil engineer, president of the Boliden Mining Corporation.

Industry and trade: Mr. Bo von Stockenström, former Minister of Agriculture, Member of the First Chamber of the Riksdag; Mr. Axel Jonsson, president of the Swedish-American Line; Mr. Erik Wijk, Northern Travel Bureau; Mr. Arvid Öberg, farmer.

Cooperatives: Mr. Albin Johansson, president of the Kooperativa Förbundet (Cooperative Federation); Mr. Axel Gjöres, editor, assistant director of the Cooperative Federation.

Labor: Mr. Ove Olsson, factory laborer.

The Press: Commander Sten Dehlgren, editor of Dagens Nyheter, chairman of the press club.

The Vasa Order in Sweden: Mr. G. H. Nordquist, editor.

The National Association for the Preservation of Swedish Culture Abroad: Mr. Vilhelm Lundström, professor, chairman of the executive committee; Mr. K. A. Hjorth, secretary.

The Methodist Church: Mr. C. A. Säfwenberg.

Descendant of Governor Printz: Mr. Gunnar Fant, Chief Justice of the City Court of Stockholm.

Secretaries of the Swedish delegation: Mr. Gustaf Geger, recording secretary of the Royal Swedish New Sweden Commission; Mr. Torsten Hansson, secretary of the delegation; Mr. H. C. Kreuger, secretary of the delegation; Mr. Erik Scharping, secretary of the delegation; Capt. Stellan Wulff, secretary of the delegation.

Newspapermen accompanying the Swedish delegation: Mr. K. E. Beckman, Tidningarnas Telegrambyrå; Mr. Hjalmar Bengtsson; Mr. Hugo Björk, Stockholms-Tidningen; Mr. Emil Forsberg, Nya Lidköpings Tidningen; Mr. Carl Mangärd, Vestmanlands läns Tidning; Mr. Karl Sandels, photographer; Mr. Sven Sandstedt, Svenska Dagbladet; Mr. Lennart Nyström, radio announcer of the Swedish Broadcasting Company.

Representing the Swedish Legation at Washington were the Honorable Wollmar F. Boström, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Sweden to the United States of America, and Mrs. Boström; and Counselor and Mrs. Folke Wennerberg.

Representing the Swedish Consulate General in New York were the Honorable Martin Kastengren, consul general, and Mrs. Kastengren.

The Finnish delegation led by Dr. E. Rudolf W. Holsti, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Finland, were the following: Mr. Väinö Hakkila, Speaker of the Parliament of Finland; Mr. Mauno Pekkala, Minister of Agriculture; Mr. Arthur Leinonen, novelist and newspaper editor; Mr. Victor Vesterinen, Member of Parliament; Mr. Kylliki Pohjala, Member of Parliament; Mr. Amos V. Anderson, banker and publisher; Rev. Sigfrid Sirenius, D. D., church leader; Mr. Kaarlo Kuusamo, Consul of Finland in New York.

Exercises in Wilmington

Monday, June 27, 1938
Morning Session in Fort Christina State Park

The day of the beginning of the tercentenary festivities in Wilmington, Del., dawned cold and rainy, but despite a steady downpour of rain the program as arranged by the Delaware Tercentenary Commission was carried out in its entirety. The Swedish M. S. Kungsholm having been buffeted by storms as it approached the American shores, docked at the marine terminal in South Wilmington on Monday morning instead of Sunday evening.

Nevertheless, the exercises were begun only an hour late at Fort Christina State Park. His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Sweden, having suddenly become seriously ill on the passage over the ocean, remained bedfast on the ship as the Swedish and Finnish delegations proceeded on a United States revenue cutter up the Christina River to the Park. Stepping ashore on the famous Rocks, where the first settlers of Delaware had landed 300 years before, the Swedish and Finnish delegations were received about 11 o'clock by the President of the United States and by Governor McMullen of the State of Delaware. During these formalities, the United States Marine Band struck up the "Star-Spangled Banner" after which the Swedish Royal Horse Guards Band responded with the Swedish national anthem.

The exercises were begun with an invocation by the Right Reverend Edvard Rodhe, Bishop of Lund, Sweden. H. R. H. Prince Gustaf Bertil, acting for his father, the Crown Prince of Sweden, presented to President Roosevelt the Kalmar Nyckel monument given by the people of Sweden to the people of the United States and addressed the audience as follows.

Address by His Highness Prince Gustaf Bertil Duke of Halland

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: To you and, through you, to all the people of these United States we bring at this moment greetings of good will and friendship from the country of Sweden, far beyond the ocean. We members of the Official Swedish Delegation to the New Sweden Tercentenary, who have just landed on the very same spot, where, 300 years ago, our forefathers first set foot on western soil, want you to know that, when we extend to you, our friends of America, these greetings, we are speaking for the whole people of our own beloved country, Sweden.

My father, the Crown Prince, profoundly regrets that a sudden illness should have prevented him from being present among us today. He has for a long time been looking forward to this occasion when it should have been given to him to dedicate the monument before us, so you will readily understand what a bitter disappointment it means to him not being able to fulfill this duty. I fervently hope that his recovery will be rapid and that he may again take his place at the head of the Swedish delegation.

From my grandfather, His Majesty King Gustaf V, I carry a special message. He commissioned me to say to you, that his thoughts are with us on this day of jubilation. With all his heart he rejoices in the hope and conviction, shared by all Swedes, that new bonds of friendship shall be the outcome of these celebrations.

I am speaking on behalf of a Swedish delegation composed of men and women, representing a great variety of occupations and interests. I believe that in modern times no more numerous or more representative mission has ever been sent abroad from Sweden. Amongst our members we count cabinet-ministers, the speakers of both Houses of the Swedish Riksdag, representatives of the Church, of the various fields of science and education, of the Administration as well as representatives of business and trade, the peasantry, industrial workers, and others.

We of the Swedish delegation are deeply moved and greatly honored by the presence here today of the President of the United States. Your gracious participation in this event, Mr. Roosevelt, conveys to us the assurance that great importance is attached to the tercentenary by the American people. Our greetings from Sweden are addressed to you, Mr. President, in the fervent hope that they may convey to you and to your country that friendly spirit, which we should like you to feel exists in Sweden as regards the United States.

The monument to be unveiled today is a gift from the people of Sweden to the people of the United States. The funds were raised through public subscription, wherein several hundred thousands of our citizens took part. I believe that amongst these subscribers, many had across the Atlantic brothers and sisters, parents and children. In contributing, they must have felt the links, which connect them and all of us with your great country, where so many of the citizens are either of Swedish birth or purely or partly of Swedish descent.

Near this spot, the Fort Christina State Park, was the first permanent settlement in the Delaware Valley. The Swedes, who landed here 300 years ago, were few in number and of poor means. Yet thus began the relations between our two Nations. Indeed, it is fitting that, together, we should commemorate that event, the inauguration of an unbroken period of international friendship.

We shall be reminded of these facts by the monument, cut by our famous sculptor, Carl Milles, in the black granite of Sweden. What memories are summoned forth at a moment like this. It is with pride we recall the memory of those almost legendary pioneers who braved the Atlantic in their little vessel, the Calmare Nyckel, and who came to found the colony of New Sweden. That little band of gallant men and women have inscribed their names on the pages of history. Their deeds have been considered important enough for the President and Congress of the United States to extend an official invitation to Sweden to take part in the commemorative celebration of this historic event. We of Sweden are deeply moved by this mark of your esteem. It meets with our high appreciation and we offer you our most sincere thanks.

In our common acclaim of a historic event of 300 years ago, we stand united, as in our admiration of those early settlers from Sweden who were such worthy and resourceful people. Their love of freedom and their integrity they carried with them as a heritage from the land of their birth. We are happy to feel that in some measure they, as well as their successors during the intervening three centuries, were able to contribute to the development into greatness of your country, the country of their adoption. We are proud to think that their virtue and valor were brought down to their descendants and thus helped in the formation of those traits which we admire in the American people of the present day.

Mr. President, Sweden of today wishes to perpetuate the first landing place of our forebears of 300 years ago. We are deeply impressed by the action of the State of Delaware, which so generously has turned The Rocks into the Fort Christina State Park, so as to make it a landmark for future generations of the birth of Swedish-American history. This monument is a symbol of the affection which my country feels for yours, and in everlasting memory of the first Swedish settlers on the banks of the Delaware River it is my solemn duty to present it to you, Mr. President, as a gift from the Swedish people to the people of the United States of America to be kept in custody in this Fort Christina State Park by the State of Delaware.

The President of the United States accepted the monument and addressed the assembly as follows:

Address by the Honorable Franklin D. Roosevelt
President of the United States

Your Royal Highnesses, Ladies and Gentlemen: This is a day of happy significance to three nations. I welcome you, for you represent a true friendship under which we have lived from the earliest times unmarred by any rift, unbroken by any misunderstanding. You are thrice welcome to our shores.

It is a matter of keen sorrow to me that His Royal Highness the Crown Prince is unable to be at this historic spot today, but all of us pray that his recovery will be speedy and complete - and I personally look forward to welcoming him and his family at Hyde Park or at Washington the end of this week.

I accept with profound gratitude, in behalf of the people of the United States, this noble monument placed here through the generosity of the people of Sweden. I am confident that to generations yet unborn in Sweden and in the United States it will typify close association and continued good will between our two Nations.

I am fortunate in having personal association with the colony of Sweden, for one of my ancestors, William Beekman, served as vice director or governor of the colony of New Sweden on the Delaware River from 1658 to 1663. And I am also proud that Swedish blood runs in my veins, for another of my ancestors, Martin Hoffman, was an early Swedish settler of New Amsterdam.

My friend, the Governor of Delaware, holds office in direct official succession from the governors of New Sweden - which reminds me of a recent rhyme descriptive of the famous governor, Johan Printz, that doughty pioneer who is said to have tipped the scales at 300 pounds:

No Gov. of Del. before or since
has weighed as much as Johan Printz

Your Royal Highnesses: It is a privilege to make grateful acknowledgment of the outstanding contributions made to our national life by men and women of Swedish blood. To this spot came the pioneers. But in the succeeding centuries tens of thousands of others have come to our shores and added their strength and their fine qualities of citizenship to the American nation. In every phase of our history, in every endeavor - in commerce and industry, in science and art, in agriculture, in education and religion, in statecraft and government - they have well played their part.

Nor have we as Americans forgotten that after the War of the Revolution, Sweden was the first neutral European power to negotiate a treaty of amity and trade with our young and struggling nation. All these things we recall today with grateful hearts.

And to you who are here as representatives of the people of Finland, I extend an equally hearty welcome. Men and women from Finland have contributed greatly to our American civilization. Finland, small in size but mighty in honor, occupies an especially warm place in the American heart.

Sweden, Finland, and the United States will continue their service in the days to come in the cause of friendship and of peace among the nations of the world.

The President, having accepted the monument for the Nation, delivered it to Governor McMullen for its permanent care by the State of Delaware. Dr. E. Rudolf W. Holsti, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Finland, thereupon presented a gold medal to President Roosevelt; and the Honorable Thomas F. Bayard, president of the Delaware Tercentenary Commission, also presented a gold medal to the President from the State of Delaware.

Services in Old Swedes Church

There then followed a religious ceremony in the "Old Swedes" Church in Wilmington, attended by the official delegations from Sweden and Finland. The service was conducted by the Right Reverend Henry St. George Tucker, D. D., presiding bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of America, the Right Reverend Edvard Rodhe, D. T., Bishop of Lund, Sweden, and the Reverend P. O. Bersell, D. D., president of the Augustana Lutheran Synod of America.

Afternoon Session at Rodney Square

Following a luncheon in Hotel Du Pont given by the State of Delaware for the official delegations from Sweden and Finland and the official representatives of the United States Government, headed by the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, exercises were held at Rodney Square. His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Sweden, despite his illness, spoke to the many thousands of people present by means of the radio and an amplifying system from his suite on board the M. S. Kungsholm.

Address by His Royal Highness Gustaf Adolf
Crown Prince of Sweden

The Crown Princess and I would first of all like to thank you for the glorious welcome given to us in this beautiful town of Wilmington. We have come with the official Swedish delegation from far away Sweden across the Atlantic. But indeed we do not feel like coming to a foreign country. For we feel that we are amongst friends of a kindred spirit.

We have all been looking forward with the greatest expectations to this visit to your country. As some of you may remember, the Crown Princess and myself already once before, 12 years ago, visited the United States. Those pleasant and interesting remembrances have been with us ever since then. Nowhere in the whole world have we been given more sincere hospitality or experienced more genuine kindness than on that occasion. It is then but natural that we should be delighted to return to this wonderful and great country of yours.

The Swedish official delegation, at the head of which I have the pleasure to be, feels greatly honored by the joint invitation of the Federal Government and the government of the State of Delaware to take part in the tercentenary celebrations of the foundation of New Sweden. We are happy to see together with us the representatives of our brother-country Finland, which at the time of the establishment of the colony formed a very important part of our realm and therefore joined in our colonial enterprise.

Three hundred years ago there arrived on the shores of the Delaware a small but determined band of Swedish colonists. They were united in common allegiance to the old country, in a common faith, and in a common belief in the importance of their mission to the New World. I think there are in the history of European colonization few documents more sincere than the instructions given in 1642 by the Queen of Sweden to Governor Printz, enumerating his duties to, first the Swedes, secondly the other settlers from Europe, and thirdly the Indians.

In relation to the Swedes he was to promote to the best of his ability a sincere piety, in all respects, toward Almighty God; to maintain the public worship, to support a proper ecclesiastical discipline; to urge instructions and virtuous education of the young; to administer justice according to the Swedish laws; to preserve as far as practical the manners and customs of Sweden.

As to the Dutch, he was to cultivate a friendly intercourse, and he was to continue the friendly commercial relations with the English in Virginia.

Respecting the Indians, the Governor was to confirm the original treaty with them and in the future purchases to regard them as rightful owners of the country. He was to treat all the neighboring tribes in the most equitable and humane manner, so that no injury, by violence or otherwise, should be done to them by any of his people.

I think this document shows that the Swedish settlers were from the beginning dedicated to peace, to friendly relations with their neighbors, and to law and order amongst themselves. I think we are entitled to say that the Swedish settlement was built on the best traditions of the mother country. And even when the political bonds with Sweden were severed, those deeply rooted qualities of the Swedish colonists remained unaltered. It is a remarkable fact that Sweden for 150 years after it lost political control of its colony continued to send ministers for the religious needs of the colonists in Delaware. The last of the ministers sent out by the Swedish King to preach the Gospel to the descendants of the original Swedes continued his work up to the year 1831, when he died and was buried in American soil.

The relations of the Swedish colonists to the Indians were always friendly. By treating the native tribes in a humane manner they won their friendship, and I think this policy explains why the Delaware Valley did not have the sanguinary Indian wars experienced in other colonies. As early as the latter half of the seventeenth century Luther's catechism was published simultaneously in Swedish and in the language of the Indians of the Delaware Valley. It is in many ways a remarkable little book; incidentally it seems to be one of the very first attempts at Lutheran missionary work outside Europe. On its frontispiece you find the arms of the Kingdom of Sweden, surrounded on the right by a symbol of the Swedish Nation and on the left by an Indian chieftain in full war dress. This equitable attitude toward the Indians is very characteristic of the whole book. The author says in the somewhat peculiar language of the time: "Notwithstanding the fact that nature has not bestowed on the infidel natives very deep intelligence, able to grasp the truth of subtle sciences, I am in a position to state that according to my experience the natives, when treated in an understanding and friendly manner, are quite prepared to receive and understand the fundamentals of the Christian faith." There is in these words a spirit of tolerance exceptional in the century when they were written.

It is true that the Swedish settlement on the Delaware was an enterprise of a fairly limited duration. It is also true that this bold enterprise did not yield the results originally hoped for by the Swedish Government. From our point of view it is, however, neither the number of the colonists nor the success of the Swedish Government's activities which is important; it is the fact that these early Swedish settlers were animated by the high principles of law and order, of religious tolerance, of liberty and justice, of those very principles which we are happy to recognize as the essentials of the American civilization.

Since that day - 300 years ago - when the first Swedish settlers arrived in this country, hundreds of thousands of Swedes have come over the ocean to seek new homes in the United States. They have founded settlements, they have tilled their farms and built their cities. They have given to this new country of theirs magistrates - such as John Morton and John Hansson, faithful servants, both of them, to the father of your country, George Washington. They have given soldiers - such as those thousands of Swedes who took part in the Civil War. They have given men of genius - such as John Ericsson, who served that other great President of yours, Abraham Lincoln. And in acting thus, they will have done honor to their old country, Sweden, which follows forever with keen interest the doings of her sons and daughters and of their descendants in the far-away country beyond the seas. In this way they have tried to repay their debt to their adopted country, the country of almost boundless possibilities and of a glorious future.

We are gratified to recollect at this moment that people from our country should have contributed through their work and their ideals to the formation and upbuilding of the United States of today. The ideals of freedom, of peace, and good will to all men, of independence and of democracy have for a long time been kindred by Swedes and Americans alike. We are happy at this moment to think that these ideals will forever bind our two peoples together in friendship and understanding.

The principal address of the afternoon was made by the Secretary of State, the Honorable Cordell Hull.

Address by the Honorable Cordell Hull
United States Secretary of State

Your Royal Highnesses, distinguished visitors from Sweden and Finland, Governor McMullen, Senator Bayard, ladies and gentlemen:

I welcome the privilege of taking part with you today in these ceremonies to commemorate the first permanent settlement of the Delaware River Valley by colonists from Sweden. That settlement marked the start of three centuries of participation by Swedes and Finns in the development of the United States and the growth of the American people. The presence today of the President of the United States, of Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess of Sweden, and of official delegations from the Governments of Sweden and of Finland, and from the States of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and other States testify to the importance of the occasion.

In the tragic clash of religious fundamentals which we know as the Thirty Years War, no figure stands forth more eminently than that farsighted statesman and great military leader, Gustavus Adolphus. A craftsman in the art of government, without peer in the art of war, he carried Sweden through those tumultuous times to the zenith of her power. Home from his brilliant campaigns in Russia and Poland, he turned to a task, begun earlier in his reign, that of rebuilding the internal structure of Sweden, and to the new and important task of finding additional revenues for the maintenance of the enlarged Swedish State.

At that time, Europe rang with stories of the riches which Spain had drawn, and which Holland and England were beginning to draw, from the New World. Accordingly, the South Company was chartered by the Swedish Crown, to establish colonies and carry on commerce, as well as to spread the Gospel among uncivilized peoples. In this, as in his other enterprises, Gustavus Adolphus was actuated by the thought which he once expressed as follows: "The majesty of the State and the Church of God within it are well worthy of the sacrifice of comfort and even of life."

The first project for the establishment of Swedish colonies failed of realization. Gustavus Adolphus returned to the wars, to the historic victory of Breitenfeld, and to his death amid the success of Lutzen.

The idea, however, had taken root. Not long after the death of Gustavus Adolphus, his vision and initiative became a reality, and Sweden entered upon the American stage. This development was planned and successfully executed by such men as Axel Oxenstierna, whom Cromwell had called the great man of the Continent, and who acted as regent during the minority of Queen Christina; Fleming, president of the College of Commerce; and three Dutch statesmen of commerce, who had chosen Sweden as the scene of their later activities, including Peter Minuit - the same Peter Minuit who had earlier purchased the island of Manhattan for the Dutch.

It was on a historic day in March 1638 that the first small band of 25 Swedish colonists landed at The Rocks - a spot forever to be marked by the magnificent and fitting memorial unveiled this morning. The flood tide of Swedish power had touched at last the shores of the New World. The plans of Gustavus Adolphus had matured.

The manner of the first contact is not without significance. Though the first colonists were soldiers, no violence marked their arrival. Without threats, without force, following the manner of just men they chose the land they needed and negotiated for its purchase. No Indian wars, no savage massacres, mar the annals of New Sweden on the Delaware.

I will not dwell on the difficulties and discouragements of that first group of settlers, and of those others, Swedes and Finns, who followed after. Forts and villages were built, the fur trade developed, and, as slowly the colony grew in numbers, more and more land was cleared, roads were constructed, churches and courts of law established. New Sweden took form, and prospered.

At the height of the settlement's prosperity, the Dutch, early claimants of the region through the right of discovery, descended in force. After a brief struggle in September 1655 Governor Rising was obliged to surrender. New Sweden was at an end. Sweden's colony disappeared, but the colony of Swedes and Finns remained.

New Sweden had but a brief span of 17 years as a political entity. Its effect upon the history of the mother country was slight, but in the development of American history its men and women and their descendants were to play no minor role. William Penn described those who were here when he first came as "a plain, strong, industrious people, * * * proper and strong of body. * * * I see few young men more sober and industrious." No finer compliment could be paid to any people. No sounder qualities for the settlement of a wild and new country could be desired.

These Swedes and Finns were hardy folk, physically vigorous, accustomed to toil and scarcity, trained in agriculture. To them and to their fellow countrymen who came to us in the great migrations of the early nineteenth century, we owe not only the agricultural development of this region, but the cultivation of much of those vast areas of our western states which now form so vital a part of our national economy.

Those early settlers were sturdy farmers, peaceful, independent, devoted to the land they tilled. Honest and industrious, they cast no covetous eyes on the possessions of others. The instructions given to Governor Printz were to cultivate friendly intercourse with his Dutch and English neighbors, to take such of them as so desired under the protection of the Swedish Crown and to use force only should force be used against him. The Indians were to be protected against violence and to be regarded always as the rightful owners of the country.

Peace and cooperation with its neighbors were the fundamentals upon which it was hoped New Sweden could be built. A profound piety and depth of religious feeling were notable characteristics of these early settlers. For over a century after the Dutch absorbed New Sweden, the Swedish churches maintained their ecclesiastical ties with the mother country thus firmly planting the Lutheran faith among the other faiths that have contributed to the spiritual life from which this country has drawn so great a measure of its strength.

It is needless for me here to name the illustrious men and women, Swedes and Finns, who since those early days along the Delaware have played their part in our political, professional, scientific, artistic, and other accomplishments. Their names are known to every school child, their contributions are a part of our national heritage.

It is not necessary for me to remind you that, in the earliest years of our independence, Sweden was one of the first powers to conclude a treaty of commerce and amity with our new Republic; that in our present effort to promote prosperity and stability within nations and confidence among nations through the restoration and increase of mutually beneficial trade, Sweden was among the first to conclude with us a reciprocal-trade agreement. Nor is it necessary for me to remind you of the reasons for the high esteem in which Finland is held in this country.

There is need today, perhaps a greater need than ever before, in relations among individuals and among nations, for those same qualities and principles which characterized the colonizers of New Sweden. At a time when prejudice, hatred, and violence are unhappily still all too prevalent and when the resources of civilization give such power to these evil influences as to threaten the very destruction of civilization itself, the world needs men and nations devoted to the principles of tolerance, friendship, and justice. It needs men and nations able to meet their most difficult problems with calmness, reasonableness, and common sense - men and nations, strong enough to command respect for their own legitimate rights and aspirations - tolerant, self-restrained, just, and wise enough to respect the legitimate rights and aspirations of others.

If, looking over the present-day field of world relationships, we see the two countries whose representatives we are welcoming here today among those which stand for peace, for stability, for orderly processes of international relations, and for a balanced adjustment in the various phases of their national life, it is thanks to their possession of those qualities of integrity and strength of character which marked the settlers along the Delaware. The descendants of these settlers have risen high in the councils of our Nation. What is of deeper significance, they and the nations from which they had sprung have made an important contribution, in our country and in the world generally, toward that firm, unobtrusive, and essential foundation of solid worth, hard labor, social idealism, and deep piety, without which no civilization can endure.

Secretary Hull was followed by Dr. E. Rudolf W. Holsti, head of the Finnish tercentenary delegation.

Address by Doctor E. Rudolf W. Holsti
Finnish Minister of Foreign Affairs

On behalf of the Finnish Government I have the honor to greet all the Finns and Americans who have come from far and near to celebrate the memory of the early Finnish Colonists and their permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley 300 years ago.

I am happy to avail myself of this opportunity to calling your attention to the excellent relations existing between Finland and the United States as well as to the numerous bonds which unite our countries. The memory of the Finnish Delaware colonists we are now going to celebrate will, no doubt, also tend towards strengthening the ties of friendship between our nations.

Finland will never forget to pay a most sincere tribute to the memory of those Finnish peasants who, 300 years ago, toiling arduously, began to clear the forests on the banks of the Delaware River. We are proud that Finns also took part in the laying of one of the innumerable foundations on which the citizens of the great democracy of the United States are today continuing to build. On the other hand the cornerstone of American political and social life, the democratic Constitution of the United States, was, indeed a most inspiring example of the greatest importance to us Finns in Finland, when we 20 years ago voted our new democratic constitution for our independent republic.

And last but not least Finland is grateful to the United States for the fair treatment of those Finnish immigrants also who in the end of last century began in ever-increasing numbers to cross the ocean with a view of finding a new home in the United States. They very soon felt at home in America although they did not forget their old native country. Thus the American Finns of today form an important bond between Finland and the United States.

On behalf of the Finnish Government, I wish to express our heartiest thanks to the Government and to the people of the United States as well as to all those citizens who have taken so much trouble in arranging so successfully the Delaware festivities which will, I am sure, be a new and splendid manifestation of our Finnish-American friendship.

At the conclusion of the addresses, a parade of many brass bands, floats, and marching groups passed the stands at Rodney Square and along many streets of Wilmington. The floats and marching groups depicted the history of the State of Delaware and its present-day industrial importance.

The first day of the tercentenary celebration ended with a supper, provided by the State of Delaware, at Longwood, the estate of Mr. Pierre S. du Pont, for the official delegations from Sweden and Finland; for all the many tourists who had come from Sweden to the celebration on the M. S. Kungsholm, and for many invited American guests. A concert in Mr. du Pont's large conservatory then followed. Musical numbers were rendered by the Swedish Jubilee Singers and the Swedish Royal Horse Guards Band, both organizations having come to America on board the Kungsholm.

Exercises in Philadelphia and Chester

Tuesday, June 28, 1938

The Kungsholm proceeded from Wilmington to the Philadelphia Navy Yard, where at 10 o'clock Admiral Wat T. Cluverius, commandant of the United States Navy Yard, Philadelphia, and staff went aboard the ship to greet His Royal Highness the Crown Prince. Gov. George H. Earle followed at the head of the Pennsylvania State delegation.

Led by Governor Earle and the Pennsylvania commission, the Swedish and Finnish delegations and the Swedish tourists left the Kungsholm and proceeded by motor to the American Swedish Historical Museum in League Island Park to attend the dedication of that institution. Again the Crown Prince participated in the exercises by speaking from the ship over the radio and an amplifying system to the many thousands of persons that had assembled on the museum grounds.

A luncheon to the official Swedish and Finnish delegations was tendered by the Swedish Colonial Society and by the Pennsylvania Historical Society at the Penn Athletic Club. Then followed a service at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes) Church.

In the evening occurred two elaborate events. At Convention Hall was held a monster religious meeting of Lutherans of many tongues to celebrate the three hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the Lutheran faith in the Delaware River Valley by the Swedish and Finnish pioneers. On this occasion the Right Reverend Edvard Rodhe, D. T., Bishop of Lund, Sweden, and Dr. P. O. Bersell, president of the Augustana Synod, were the principal participants on the program.

At the Benjamin Franklin Hotel on the same evening, the official banquet to the Swedish and Finnish delegations was tendered by the Pennsylvania Tercentenary Commission.

Wednesday, June 29, 1938

This day was also a full one for the delegations from Sweden and Finland. The functions of the morning took the visitors out of Philadelphia proper, first to the dedication exercises of Governor Printz Park at Tinicum, and later to Chester, Pa., where the Finnish delegation joined Finnish-Americans in dedicating a monument in Crozer Park to commemorate the first settlement in the vicinity by Finnish pioneers. Governor Printz Park was officially presented to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by the Swedish Colonial Society in the presence of Prince Gustaf Bertil. At Crozer Park the Honorable E. Rudolf Holsti, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Finland, presented a monument to the people of the United States. It was accepted for the city of Chester, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the United States of America, respectively, by the Honorable William Ward, Jr., mayor of Chester; the Honorable George H. Earle, Governor of Pennsylvania; and the Honorable R. H. Jackson, Solicitor General of the United States. Addresses by all the members of the Finnish delegation followed. In the afternoon another program was given at Crozer Park by Finnish-Americans.

Other events on Wednesday included a luncheon at the Pennsylvania Museum of Art; the awarding of degrees to membets of the Finnish delegation by Temple University and to members of the Swedish delegation by the University of Pennsylvania; a reception and tea at the Archaeological Museum of the University of Pennsylvania; a concert in Convention Hall, given by the Swedish Jubilee Singers from Sweden and the combined choruses of 1,000 members of the American Union of Swedish Singers; and an elaborate fireworks display on the Schuylkill River late in the evening.

Exercises in Swedesboro and Salem

Thursday, June 30, 1938

The two days of festivities in Philadelphia and Chester having thus come to an end, the royal party and the Swedish and Finnish delegations crossed the Delaware River on the morning of Thursday, June 30, to participate in the official celebration by the State of New Jersey. They first visited Trinity (Old Swedes) Church in Swedesboro, where a short service was held and a memorial plaque dedicated, Bishop Rohde, of Lund, Sweden, and Prince Gustaf Bertil participating. The party then proceeded to Salem, a city in southern New Jersey situated about two miles from the site of Fort Elfsborg, erected in 1643 by Governor Printz of the colony of New Sweden. In the city park where a replica of Fort Elfsborg had been built for the occasion, the official State exercises were held, Senator D. Stewart Craven, chairman of the New Jersey State Commission, presiding. Governor A. Harry Moore and other State officials here welcomed the delegations, and addresses were delivered by the Governor, Prince Gustaf Bertil, and others. Following the exercises, the New Jersey State Commission entertained the delegations from abroad and American guests at luncheon at the Salem Country Club House, located close to the site of Fort Elfsborg. The part in the tercentenary by the State of New Jersey was concluded with a visit of the delegations to St. Georges Church near Pennsville, which was founded by the early Swedes and Finns.

The royal party having gone to New York, the Crown Princess of Sweden and Minister and Madame Boström were guests of President and Mrs. Roosevelt at Hyde Park on the afternoon of July 1.

Events in Washington

Friday, July 1, 1938

The official Swedish and Finnish delegations arrived in Washington on the morning of July 1 to be the guests of the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission for three days. The various events were carried out successfully, thanks to the careful planning of Congressman Pehr G. Holmes, secretary of the Commission.

On July 1 a luncheon was given in honor of the delegations of Sweden and Finland at the Shoreham. An excursion on board the steamship City of Washington to Mount Vernon was made by the delegations in the late afternoon, refreshments being served on board. Upon their return to Washington the members of the delegations of Sweden and Finland were tendered a dinner on the terrace of the Shoreham Hotel.

Saturday, July 2, 1938

On Saturday morning, July 2, the Swedish and Finnish visitors were taken on a sightseeing tour of Washington, including visits to the John Ericsson statue and Arlington Cemetery.

For those members of the Swedish delegation who preferred to pay visits to various governmental departments and agencies than to go sightseeing, arrangements were made by the Federal Commission for such visits. Dr. Isak Collijn, Librarian of the Royal Library at Stockholm, was received at the Library of Congress. Lt. Gen. G. R. J. Åckerman was received at the War Department. Mr. Bo von Stockenström and Mr. Arvid Öberg were guests of the Department of Agriculture. Mr. Herman Eriksson was received by the Department of Commerce. Miss Kerstin Hesselgren, Mrs. Rickard Sandler, Dr. Hanna Rydh, and Dr. Sigfrid Hansson were the guests of Miss Mary Anderson, Director of the Women's Bureau of the Department of Labor. Miss Hesselgren and Dr. Hansson also visited the Social Security Board. On Saturday evening Miss Kerstin Hesselgren, Mrs. Rickard Sandler, and Dr. Hanna Rydh were guests at a dinner arranged by the National Women's Party. Arrangements were also made for the Honorable Karl Schlyter, former Minister of Justice, to observe procedure in the Juvenile Court of Washington; for Mr. Oscar Falkman to visit the Department of Labor; for Dr. Sigurd Curman, Custodian of Antiquities of the Realm, to visit the National Archives; and for Mr. Ove Olsson and several other delegates to call on Mr. John L. Lewis, head of the United Mine Workers, and leaders of the American Federation of Labor.

In the afternoon of Saturday a reception was given by the Finnish Minister at the Legation of Finland in honor of the Delegation of Finland.

Sunday, July 3, 1938

On Sunday morning Prince Bertil attended services at the Augustana Lutheran Church, Dr. Arthur O. Hjelm, pastor.

Luncheon was tendered by the Commission to the Delegation from Sweden at the Congressional Country Club.

In the afternoon, a reception was given by the Swedish Minister at the Legation of Sweden in honor of Her Royal Highness the Crown Princess and His Royal Highness Prince Bertil, the Swedish visitors, members of foreign legations, and other Washington residents being in attendance.

In the evening of Sunday, July 3, the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission tendered a dinner at the Mayflower Hotel in honor of Her Royal Highness the Crown Princess of Sweden, His Royal Highness Prince Bertil, and the Swedish Delegation. Senator Guffey of Pennsylvania, president of the Federal Commission, was the toastmaster and Prince Bertil delivered an address on behalf of his father, His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Sweden, who had been in a hospital in New York since the previous Tuesday. Secretary of State and Mrs. Cordell Hull, Madame Rickard Sandler, wife of the Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Swedish Minister and Madame Wollmar F. Boström, the Secretary of War and Mrs. Harry Hines Woodring, the Attorney General and Mrs. Homer S. Cummings, the Governor of Delaware and Mrs. Richard C. McMullen, and the Honorable Karl Schlyter, former Minister of Justice, and Madame Schlyter were among the 160 guests present.

Monday, July 4, 1938

The official Swedish Delegation left Washington on the morning of July 4 to go to New York where for two days they were guests of the New York Tercentenary Commission and the city. The Royal party remained in Washington until the 5th, being guests of President and Mrs. Roosevelt for tea at the White House on the afternoon of the Fourth.

Appendix A
[Public Resolution - No. 102 - 74th Congress]
[H. J. Res . 499]
Joint Resolution

Authorizing and requesting the President to extend to the Government of Sweden and individuals an invitation to join the Government and people of the United States in the observance of the three-hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley, and for other purposes.

Whereas there is to be held at Wilmington, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and at several places in other States, during the year 1938, celebrations commemorating the three-hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley, said settlement being also the first settlement of the colony of New Sweden, which embraced parts of the present States of Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey; and

Whereas, in accordance with a resolution of the General Assembly of the State of Delaware, approved March 20, 1935, the Governor of said State has appointed a commission of eleven members, designated as the Delaware Swedish Tercentenary Commission, with authority "to prepare plans for a fitting celebration by the State of Delaware on the occasion of the three-hundredth anniversary in 1938 of the founding of the first permanent settlement and the establishment of the first permanent government upon the soil of Delaware * * *; and to cooperate with other commissions or committees representing the city of Wilmington; historical, patriotic, and other societies of the State of Delaware and other States; the governments of other States; and the National Governments of the United States and Sweden"; and

Whereas at its annual meeting held in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on January 17, 1935, the Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies (embracing seventy-three constituent historical societies) adopted the following resolution:

"Whereas plans are in preparation to celebrate the tercentenary of the landing of the Swedes on the Delaware and the establishment of the first permanent white settlement, and the first government in Pennsylvania, in 1638: Now, therefore, be it

"Resolved, That this Federation pledge its hearty endorsement to such commemoration; and

"Resolved further, That the President be authorized to appoint such committee or committees to represent this Federation as may be necessary and to cooperate with similar New Jersey, Delaware, Swedish, or other committees."

Therefore be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That when, in the opinion of the President of the United States, it shall be appropriate for him to do so, the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and requested to extend to the Government of Sweden and such individuals as the President may determine an invitation to unite with the Government and people of the United States in a fitting and appropriate observance of the three-hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement of Swedish colonists in Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

Sec. 2. There is hereby established a commission to be known as the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission (hereinafter referred to as the "Commission") to be composed of fifteen commissioners, as follows: Five persons to be appointed by the President of the United States, five Members of the Senate to be appointed by the President of the Senate, and five Members of the House of Representatives to be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The Commission, on behalf of the United States, shall cooperate with representatives of the States of Delaware and Pennsylvania in the appropriate observance of such anniversary, and shall extend appropriate courtesies to such representatives of the Government of Sweden, and other persons, as may respond to the invitation of the President extended as hereinbefore provided. The members of the Commission shall serve without compensation and shall select a chairman from among their number.

Sec. 3. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $10,000 to be expended by the Commission for expenses, including actual and necessary traveling and subsistence expenses incurred while discharging its functions under this resolution.

Approved, June 5, 1936.

Appendix B
[Public Resolution - No. 71 - 75th Congress]
[Chapter 781 - 1st Session]
[S. J. Res. 135]
Joint Resolution

To amend the public resolution approved June 5, 1936, entitled "Joint resolution authorizing and requesting the President to extend to the Government of Sweden and individuals an invitation to join the Government and people of the United States in the observance of the three-hundredth anniversary of the first permanent settlement in the Delaware River Valley, and for other purposes."

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 1 of Public Resolution Numbered 102 of the Seventy-fourth Congress is amended by inserting a comma and the words "the Government of Finland" after the words "Government of Sweden" and before the word "and"; and by inserting the words "and Finnish" after the word "Swedish" and before the word colonists".

That section 2 be amended by inserting the words "the Government of Finland" after the words "Government of Sweden" and before the word "and"

Approved, August 25, 1937.

Appendix C
[Public Resolution - No. 91 - 74th Congress]
[S. J. Res. 231]
Joint Resolution

To authorize the coinage of 50-cent pieces in commemoration of the three-hundredth anniversary of the landing of the Swedes in Delaware.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in commemoration of the three-hundredth anniversary of the landing of the Swedes in Delaware there shall be coined at a mint of the United States to be designated by the Director of the Mint not less than twenty-five thousand silver 50-cent pieces of standard size, weight, and composition and of a special appropriate single design, containing some recognized emblem of the State of Delaware, to be fixed by the Director of the Mint, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, but the United States shall not be subject to the expense of making the necessary dies and other preparations for this coinage.

Sec. 2. The coins herein authorized shall bear the date 1936, irrespective of the year in which they are minted or issued, shall be legal tender in any payment to the amount of their face value, and shall be issued only upon the request of the president of the Delaware Swedish Tercentenary Commission upon payment by him of the par value of such coins, but not less than twenty-five thousand such coins shall be issued to him at any one time and no such coins shall be issued after the expiration of one year after the date of enactment of this Act. Such coins may be disposed of at par or at a premium by such commission, and the net proceeds shall be used by it in defraying the expenses incidental and appropriate to the commemoration of such event.

Sec. 3. All laws now in force relating to the subsidiary silver coins of the United States and the coining or striking of the same, regulating and guarding the process of coinage, providing for the purchase of material, and for the transportation, distribution, and redemption of coins, for the prevention of debasement or counterfeiting, for the security of the coins, or for any other purposes, whether such laws are penal or otherwise, shall, so far as applicable, apply to the coinage herein authorized.

Approved, May 15, 1936.

Appendix D

[Left out]

Appendix E

List of books relating to the colony of new Sweden

Acrelius, Israel. History of New Sweden. (Trarslated by W. M. Reynolds.) The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1876.

Balch, Thomas Willing. The Cradle of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1921.

Benson, Adolph B. (Editor). Peter Kalm's Travels in North America. New York, 1937.

Benson, Adolph B. and Hedin, Naboth (Editors). Swedes in America. New Haven, 1938.

Burr, Horace (Translator). The Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church. Wilmington, 1890.

Clay, J. C. Annals of the Swedes on the Delaware. 4th Edition. Chicago, 1938.

Conrad, Henry C. History of the State of Delaware. Wilmington, 1908.

Curtis, Charles M. and Reese, Charles Lee, Jr. History of Old Swedes Church at Wilmington. (Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication.) Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

Daugherty, M. M. Early Colonial Taxation in Delaware. (Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication.) Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

DeLannoy, Charles. A History of Swedish Colonial Expansion. (Brinton, George E., and Reed, H. Clay, Translators.) Newark, Delaware, 1938.

Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication. Delaware Tercentenary Almanack and, Historical Repository. Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication. Pictorial Map of Delaware. (Designed by Jacob Riegel, Jr.) Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

deValinger, Leon, Jr. Colonial Military Organization in Delaware, 1638-1776. (Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication.) Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

Dunaway, Wayland F. A History of Pennsylvania. New York, 1935.

Ferris, Benjamin. History of the Original Settlements on the Delaware. Wilmington, 1846.

Henriksson, Fritz (Compiler). A report on Sweden's Participation in the United States Celebration of the New Sweden Tercentenary. Stockholm, 1939.

Holm, T. Campanius. Province of New Sweden. (Translated by P. S. duPonceau). Philadelphia, 1833.

Johnson, Amandus. The Swedish Settlements on the Delaware. 1638-1664. Philadelphia, 1911.

Johnson, Amandus. The Swedes on the Delaware. 1638-1664. The Swedish Colonial Society, Philadelphia, 1915.

Johnson, Amandus. Johan Casson Rising, the Last Governor of New Sweden. The Swedish Colonial Society, Philadelphia, 1915.

Johnson, Amandus (Translator). Geographia Americae with an Account of the Delaware Indians, by Peter Lindeström. The Swedish Colonial Society, Philadelphia, 1925.

Johnson, Amandus (Translator). The Instruction for Governor Johan Printz. The Swedish Colonial Society, Philadelphia, 1930.

Johnson, Amandus (Translator). The journal and Biography of Nicholas Collin. 1746-1831. The New Jersey Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1936.

Keen, Gregory B. The Descendants of Jöran Kyn of New Sweden. The Swedish Colonial Society, Philadelphia, 1913.

Lincoln, Anna T. Three Centuries Under Four Flags. Rutland, Vt. 1937.

Paxson, Henry D. Where Pennsylvania History Began. Philadelphia, 1926.

Powell, Walter A. A History of Delaware. Boston, 1928.

Ryden, George H. Delaware - The First State in the Union. (Delaware Tercentenary Commission Publication.) Wilmington, Delaware, 1938.

Scharf, J. T. History of Delaware. Philadelphia, 1888.

Vincent, Francis. History of the State of Delaware. Philadelphia, 1870.

Ward, Christopher L. The Dutch and Swedes on the Delaware. Philadelphia, 1930.

Ward, Christopher L. New Sweden on the Delaware. Philadelphia, 1938.

Winsor, Justin (Editor). Narrative and Critical History of America. Volume 4, Chapter 9: New Sweden, or the Swedes on the Delaware, by Gregory B. Keen. Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1884.

Works Progress Administration. Delaware, A Guide to the First State. (American Guide Series - Federal Writers' Project.) 1938.

Works Progress Administration. The Records of the Swedish Lutheran Churches at Raccoon and Penns Neck, 1713-1786. (American Guide Series - Federal Writers' Project.) With an introduction and notes by Amandus Johnson, 1938.

Works Progress Administration. The Swedes and Finns in New Jersey. (American Guide Series - Federal Writers' Project.) With an introduction by Amandus Johnson, 1938.

Wuorinen, John H. The Finns on the Delaware, 1638-1655. New York, 1938.

Published by the Committee on Foreign Affairs as Observance of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the First Permanent Settlement in the Delaware River Valley 1938. July 1, 1940; Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and ordered to be printed. [1940, 76th Congress, 3d session. House of Representatives. Document Nr 856].1940, 64 p.

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